Monthly Archives: July 2017

Cheerio for now

I’ve decided not to renew my website subscription. Largely because of financial restraints but also as I think it’s outlived it’s usefulness. I have the option of a free version and may continue with that but as I understand it, the URL will be slightly different however I’m yet to confirm that.

I’m taking the opportunity to consider which direction I’d like the blog to go in; I enjoy showing off my yarny adventures but I also like having a small platform to increase awareness about ME and other issues. There are wider areas of my thoughts that I might want to discuss as well.

A recent discussion in a knitting group brought home how society has internalised discrimination against disabled people. For example, seeing someone in a wheelchair equals belief that a venue is accessible. It doesn’t occur that whilst the person might be there in a chair, their actual experience of the event may be one of real difficulty and frustration, for example.

I also have lots of strong opinions around other social justice issues – to expand, my initial idea about this post was going to be based on our attitude towards aging women and how pressurised we are into dyeing our hair to cover grey (I recently had two different conversations regarding how ‘aging’ grey hair is, as if aging is something to hide and be ashamed of). 

However, I’m yet to decide whether or not my opinions are worth sharing with the wider world (I don’t mean this in a falsely modest way but simply in a realistic awareness of my ‘size’).

My blog has the potential to be a negative experience for me as well. I have a tendency to rant without paying much attention to who I could hurt in doing so, including myself, so maybe curtailing the platform for this may be a positive one for me.

Most importantly, this blog has humbled me beyond words, I’m constantly amazed at the fact that you bother to read it in such numbers and some of you have even taken the time to comment. So a huge thank you for sharing my journey thus far.

I’ll leave you with my final ‘ta daah’ photo, a crocheted blanket in Stylecraft Special DK. The pattern is ‘Rosslyn’ by Helen Shrimpton, a paid pattern on her website.

How to tell you’re a fibreholic

1. When most textiles in your home have little resident ‘fuzzies’; I could probably clean off a good 50g of random fluff from various curtains, chairs and rugs. Bonus points for sparkle.

2. When you regard your house as being spotless despite the previous point because discarded fibre is decor right?

3. An easy one but when every room in your house (except the bathroom – steam and fibre do not a happy marriage make) is essentially fibre storage, living space is secondary (while trying to come up with an example of this, I honestly couldn’t think what else you might keep in your drawers other than fibre, yarn and tools for working with said items) (I mean obviously there’s going to be the odd man drawer and who knows what’s in those but other than that…) 

4. When rooms are divided into ‘areas’; like there’s my place for Nunoco fibre, I have a special sweater yarn stash and it’s really important to keep commercially dyed sock yarn away from indie dyed as you know a skirmish will break out if they get too close.
5. When people come into your house for the first time, they look around looking slightly confused and tend to make odd strangled noises. It’s important to remember this:


Just because having piles of animal fur around the place is entirely normal, not everyone has realised this yet

6. Most meals come garnished with the odd stray strand of wool or if you’re lucky, cashmere

7. Absolutely every container holds fibre of some description 

8. When your other half (God bless Mr Weaving Heart) calmly accepts that whilst they are not able to leave anything lying around, you will leave a path of spindles, bags of fibre, random clumps of roving, piles of knitting, stitch counters, lazy Kates, odd bobbins and spindle bowls in your wake. You can usually work out where I was last sitting by the number of these items piled around it.

9. It’s not unusual to discover spinning fluff bunnies in your knickers

10. Dressing gowns are especially prone to collecting fibre, I’m usually attached to several ozs of roving, generally offset to my left (drafting) side

11. There are infinite places for your cat to snuggle down in.


12. The bath and/or sink is just as likely to contain wool as an actual person 

So there you have it, I’m clearly beyond help, maybe you’re not but why bother even resisting?!